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Listings

Animals Deserving of Proper Treatment (A.D.O.P.T.) is a private, “no-kill”, non-profit 501(c)(3) organization that has found homes for more than 20,000 pets. We provide a temporary, loving home for dogs and cats that no longer have a family of their own. The animals in our shelter have ended up here for a variety of reasons ranging from abandonment, to rescue from an abusive situation, to owner surrender because they no longer are able to take care of them. Our animals are loving, family pets who are desperately awaiting their forever home. A.D.O.P.T. was founded in 1989 by a group of dedicated volunteers determined to find homes for animals in need. Over the years, our objective has remained the same: to place animals into permanent, caring homes and advance the humane treatment of animals through education.

 Listings /  North America

A Forever-Home Rescue Foundation is a non-profit dog rescue group that operates in the Northern Virginia / Washington Metropolitan area. We strive to make quality dogs available for adoption and do our best to match prospective adopters with the right animal! We are a group of experienced rescuers that can help you find just the right pet to fit your lifestyle – whether you’re a couch potato, an avid runner or anything in between. Visit us at one of our adoption events and see what difference experience can make! AFH is registered with GuideStar and JustGive. GuideStar is a database of IRS-approved 501(c)(3) non-profit organizations. JustGive is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to connect people with the charities and causes they care about and to increase overall giving. You can donate to AFH via the JustGive icon on the left side of each page.

 Listings /  North America

All 4 Paws Rescue is a non-profit, foster-based, all-breed, no-kill animal rescue based in Malvern, PA that offers rescue, rehabilitation, and sanctuary to animals in need. Our goal is to offer each and every one of these animals a safe, permanent and loving home. All 4 Paws Rescue was founded in May 2009. Since inception, All 4 Paws Rescue has saved over 13,000 needy animals and continues to grow and save lives daily. For most of the animals rescued by All 4 Paws, we are their last chance. Many reside in shelters that are not even open to the public, but are instead holding facilities where the animals go to die. Many come from commercial breeding facilities that throw them away like trash when they are no longer useful for breeding purposes or not fit for sale. Puppies, purebreds, family pets - these are animals you would never expect to end up in these horrible situations, but it is a sad reality. Through our extensive rescue network, All 4 Paws has developed relationships nationwide that allow us to save countless lives that would otherwise have been ended. As a foster based rescue, our animals live in homes with our families and our personal pets, so we are able to learn a great deal about them and work on preparing them for their forever home. There is no greater feeling than releasing these wonderful animals into a safe yard and watching them run and play as they should. They sleep curled up in soft beds in our homes when hours before they laid on concrete floors. They feel grass beneath their feet when many have never experienced the outdoors. Having never known freedom or a full belly, they are so very thankful. This is why we at All 4 Paws Rescue do what we do - because they all deserve a home.

 Listings /  North America

HALO is an acronym that stands for Helping Animals Live On. It is a succinct, four-word definition of what we are here for. It is the reason each and every employee and volunteer puts two feet on the ground. It is a passion that goes beyond just loving dogs and cats. It is a driving force in our lives; to make this community, this world, a safe place for homeless pets. Located in sunny Phoenix, Arizona, HALO Animal Rescue is a safety net for thousands of homeless dogs and cats each year. We are a no-kill facility, which means we never euthanize an animal because we have run out of room, but it also means we are limited in the animals we can take in at any given time. These animals are lovingly cared for while they are prepared for adoption, and then they are adopted into loving homes. Our commitment goes beyond just caring for the animals within our shelter, we are working to create a better welfare system for all the animals in this community and beyond. We feel it is critical to continue to nurture relationships with other welfare agencies to create life-saving strategies, so we can all fully utilize our available resources to save as many lives as possible. We are committed to seeing an end to the killing of savable pets. In order to reach this goal, we must all work together, building from our strengths, to provide the care you as the public want and expect us to give. In return, we ask for your support by providing a helping hand, temporary shelter or the financial means to provide the care they need. Their lives are dependent upon every person taking part and joining the fight to save them.

 Listings /  North America

Heartland Animal Shelter is a no-kill humane 501 c 3 organization dedicated to finding homeless pets forever homes while educating the public on the importance of spaying and neutering their pets in order to help with the pet overpopulation problem. It was founded in 2002 by Dr Herbert Preiser whose mission it is to provide care, humane treatment and adoption for cats and dogs in need through community outreach, progressive programs and partnership collaboration.

 Listings /  North America

Founded in 1998, Help For Homeless Pets is a volunteer, no-kill, non-profit organization. Help for Homeless Pets (HHP) is a 501(c)(3) no-kill animal shelter operating in Billings, Montana, and serving primarily Yellowstone County since 1998. Our primary goals are: to find permanent homes for homeless pets; and to promote spay/neutering in an effort to curb pet homelessness and other tragic consequences caused by overpopulation. HHP does not kill or euthanize animals; rather, we provide shelter at the facility or in a foster home until a homeless pet finds its permanent home. We house up to 100 cats and 40 dogs at our facility located at 2910 Hannon Road in Billings, Montana. We have a wide variety of adoptable cats and dogs, including adorable kittens and puppies that can't wait to find their forever homes! Thousands of stray and feral (wild) cats die each year in pounds and shelters. They are the offspring of unfixed abandoned or lost pet cats that have been forced to make their home in the streets in every community. Trap-Neuter-Return is the humane option to help reduce their numbers, as opposed to the traditional method of trap and kill. Trap-Neuter-Return is shown to be the only method that works. We need people to recognize this and to support their community ferals by feeding, sheltering and spaying and neutering, after all it's the only right and compassionate thing to do.

 Listings /  North America

At Home at Last Dog Rescue, we are a group of volunteers whose goal is to save the lives of homeless dogs suffering in high-kill shelters, as well as owner-surrender dogs who need to be re-homed due to unfortunate circumstances. We are not a shelter, and we have no central location for the dogs we rescue. We pull dogs from various shelters and provide foster homes until they are adopted. In doing so, we hope to provide an alternative to the purchase of puppy mill and pet store dogs, thereby reducing the demand for, and ultimately, the supply of, such dogs. We strive to match each dog with the right family after the dog has been observed in a foster home. As a growing rescue group, we are in constant need of volunteers who can assist us in saving dogs.

 Listings /  North America

Homeless Pet Clubs (HPC) is an adjunct organization of The Homeless Pets Foundation (HPF), which was created in 1998 by Dr. Michael Good, an Atlanta, Georgia veterinarian, to save homeless pets. Dr. Good founded the 501 (c) (3) nonprofits to help animal shelters adopt-out more pets. Dr. Good wants to help these animals find loving, forever homes. His mantra, "We want to save them all!" HPF provides critical medical care, food, foster care, and comfort to homeless animals. The organization also maintains a network of communication between volunteers, shelters, advocates, and potential adoptees, leveraging volunteer enthusiasm and technology to save lives. Since late in 2002, HPF and HPC have placed nearly 20,000 animals in loving homes. The Homeless Pet Clubs were created to bring two groups together to help find homes for homeless pets. First, the shelter or rescue organization and then the clubs (which could be the 2nd grade class at your local school, the fire station, your office, or a group interested in helping homeless pets find their forever home). The way this works is that the shelter or rescue group setup their organization on our website. They select some dogs and cats that may have a hard time attracting families to adopt them (maybe they are senior pets, maybe they have health issues that need attention, maybe they need to be the only pet in the home). The photos and info about these pets are added to the website. Next, clubs are formed. You may be asked to be a club by the area organizer of the Homeless Pet Clubs, or you can click the "Get Involved" link on our website and start your own club. The club then selects one of the pets from your Homeless Pet Clubs local shelter or rescue group and then goes to work, bringing information to your community with the goal of finding a forever home for your selected pet. Once adopted, your club selects another pet and you do it again; find the next forever home! School clubs are perfect because the kids love to help and feel accomplished when the pet they selected from the local Homeless Pet Clubs shelter finds their forever home. The other great thing that comes from kids being involved is that they learn what it means to help their community!

 Listings /  North America

Homeward Trails Animal Rescue is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization that provides pet adoption in Virginia, Washington, DC and Maryland. We find homes for dogs and cats rescued from low-income, rural animal shelters or whose owners can no longer care for them; abandoned hunting dogs who are dumped in woods or left at shelters; owned pets whose owners can no longer care for them; and animals who have been injured, abused and neglected. We have helped internationally as well: we have rescued dogs from Thailand, China, Korea, Russia, Peru, Greece and Kuwait. And we have run a full-time program in Puerto Rico for 4 years, rescuing more than 450 dogs and providing Trap-Neuter-Return services for more than 500 cats. We actively seek to reduce the rate of euthanasia, support proactive spay/neuter practices, and educate the public about how to care for their animals in a humane way. We facilitate adoptions from local shelters and support a large network of foster care providers who take homeless dogs and cats into their homes, care for them, rehabilitate them when needed, and prepare them for their permanent adoptive homes.

 Listings /  North America

Gulf Coast Humane Society is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit, no-kill, animal welfare organization established as the first non-profit animal welfare organization in southwest Florida in 1947. Our shelter does not receive any federal, state, or county funding and no funding from the Humane Society of the United States or ASPCA. We rely solely on donations, grants, bequests and fundraising events to further our mission of caring for the neglected and abandoned pets of Southwest Florida. As a no-kill facility, the pets of the Gulf Coast Humane Society remain in our care until they find their forever home. Our mission is to provide humane care for surrendered animals by offering refuge, providing medical care, and facilitating an adoptive home. Each year we take in more than 3,000 animals in need of compassionate care. The work we do to care for these animals is all possible thanks to the support of those of you in the community who care deeply about the welfare of homeless pets. They thank you - and so do we.

 Listings /  North America

Community leaders established Houston SPCA nearly 100 years ago to meet the needs of animals in Houston, and we have always put their care and wellbeing first in everything we do. An iconic Houston nonprofit, our organization has grown along with our beloved city, and we have continually adapted our efforts to help the animals in our community best. Since our inception, Houston SPCA has saved and provided services for millions of animals. Our mission at Houston SPCA is to promote commitment to and respect for all animals and free them from suffering, abuse and exploitation. We have constructed facilities that enable our professionals to share resources across the entire campus, making our services and programs much more efficient. There’s no better way to illustrate the scope of our programs and services than by giving an overview of the Houston SPCA campus.

 Listings /  North America

Hearts United for Animals is a Smithsonian Award-winning, state-of-the-art no-kill shelter and sanctuary dedicated to the relief of animal suffering. HUA has rescued over 10,000 dogs from puppy mills, has provided low cost spay/neuter services for over 13,000 patients, provides temporary housing for animals of families fleeing domestic violence. Place dogs and cats in wonderful new homes across the country through our JetSet Dogs program, and assists with veterinary expenses of animals in need when their owners have nowhere else to turn. Dogs and cats who cannot be placed due to medical or behavioral issues stay with us forever as Sanctuary Sweethearts. By the end of 2016, the HUA Clinic surpassed the number of 16,000 dog and cat patients, preventing over 1 million births. The 50-dollar fee requested by the clinic (and waived if it is a burden) includes tests, vaccinations, and anything else our animal welfare veterinarian and staff can do for the health of the animals. Hearts United for Animals is determined to place each dog and cat in the right home for that particular animal. We take lots of time to get to know each one and can tell you in detail about their personalities.

 Listings /  North America

For over 100 years, the Humane Society of New York has been a presence in New York City, caring for animals in need when illness, injury or homelessness strikes. In 1904, we were founded to protect the city's horses against abuse. Members fought for laws to punish negligent owners and place watering troughs in streets and parks. As funds allowed, the Society expanded to include a free medical clinic and a small adoption center for cats and dogs. Today our hospital and our Vladimir Horowitz and Wanda Toscanini Horowitz Adoption Center help more than 38,000 dogs and cats annually, and their numbers continue to grow. At the Society, the quality of each animal's life is paramount. Long before it was popular to think of animals as individuals - to consider their physical and emotional needs when taking responsibility for their care - we were doing just that. That means every day, every dog gets exercise time in the rooftop run, and the chance to walk outdoors with staff and volunteers. Cats enjoy daily play sessions outside their kennels. This very personal care is fully as important to a pet's well-being as the inoculations, spay/neuter and other veterinary care provided during its stay in the adoption center. "This doesn't feel like a shelter" remark many visitors to the Society. "It feels like a home." On any given day, the Humane Society of New York is responsible for hundreds of animals with diverse needs. The Humane Society of New York has long been noted for its innovative, highly individualized approach to animal care; its pioneer attitude is now reflected in programs coming to the fore nationwide. Each year finds us reaching for a higher level of care. As new technologies and medical advances such as digital radiography and ultrasound-guided biopsy become available, the Humane Society of New York evolves as well. Developing programs offer exciting opportunities for support and sponsorship.

 Listings /  North America

The Humane Society of Tampa Bay, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, provides shelter for homeless & at risk animals, adoptions, hospital and TNVR services for the general public; operates independently of the Humane Society of the United States. And we, along with our animals, would love to have you as a partner on this journey. Stand with us and other like-minded individuals, animal welfare organizations, foundations and companies as we work to end animal homelessness in Tampa Bay. By lending your voice, mobilizing supporters and customers, and helping to raise critical funds, you can change the lives of pets and people. Collaboration and partnership are important to the Humane Society of Tampa Bay. We understand that needs-driven, community-based work is the key to ending animal homelessness. Help end animal homelessness by partnering with a leading animal welfare nonprofit.

 Listings /  North America

IndyHumane was originally founded as the Humane Society of Indianapolis in 1905 by nine individuals who wanted to make a difference for those who were suffering. At the time, we took in not just abused and neglected pets, but women and children of abusive marriages and relationships, as well. As IndyHumane expanded to serve a larger number of animals, the organization’s footprint in the city expanded, as well, eventually holding properties as far north as the Indianapolis Zoo near its home at the time in Washington Park. In the mid-1960s, IndyHumane’s leadership decided it was time to consolidate and establish a single location for all our operations. In 1965, we purchased a small farm at the corner of 79th Street and Michigan Road from local legend Otto Ray. The farmhouse and several outbuildings — all larger than the organization had worked in previously — were converted to housing homeless and abused animals. Dogs and cats were kept near horses, donkeys, and other barnyard animals, and just a handful of staff and volunteers took care of everything. In the late 1980s, both Indianapolis and animal welfare laws had changed significantly, and we were called upon less and less for barnyard animals and more and more for dogs, cats, and other domesticated pets. A plan was put together to build a brand-new shelter specifically to house and care for companion pets, and the facility as we know it today began taking shape. Construction lasted between 1989 and 1991, and the new shelter – with capacity for 300 dogs, cats, and small mammals – opened to a wave of excitement and community support. Not long after, however, IndyHumane’s leadership realized the need to add more medical capacity to adequately handle the complex medical needs of shelter pets, and to better care for sick and injured pets in a shelter setting. The 12,000-square-foot IndyHumane Downtown Clinic, created with the assistance of Halstead Architects, has allowed us to continue expanding our services to animals and owners in need throughout Indianapolis.

 Listings /  North America

Kitsap Humane Society is a nonprofit, charitable organization that depends upon the kindness and generosity of its community to find homes for homeless pets. We spay/neuter thousands of animals each year to prevent animal overpopulation and reduce the number of future homeless pets. Sheltering animals since 1908, Kitsap Humane Society envisions a time when all adoptable pets have loving homes. At the heart of our work is always the pets we serve – both those who come through our shelter doors and into our care as well as owned animals in our community. We commit to humanely supporting animals through our variety of shelter programs and comprehensive veterinary services – and rescuing, rehabilitating, and finding loving homes for as many animals as we can. Lifting up our community programs and services, including equipping our Animal Control Officers with resources they need to meet our community members where they are at, as well as forming new and strengthening existing relationships with fellow animal welfare organizations, social services organizations, government partners, and representatives, tribal groups, and more is crucial to ensure long-term sustainability and efficacy in our work to continue transforming animal welfare in our community. We strive to reduce unnecessary surrenders to the shelter, break down unnecessary barriers and provide life-changing solutions to people and pets in need. Through the expansion of our Pet Food Pantry and low-cost veterinary services, in addition to restoring programs and services – such as our microchip and vaccination clinics – previously paused during the pandemic, we can continue our work to improve the health and wellness of vulnerable pets in Kitsap and Mason counties. More than ever, it’s time to provide our shelter and community pets with a veterinary facility that matches the excellence of our work. Thanks to recent legislation, Phase 2 of our Pet Lifesaving Campaign will usher in a new era at Kitsap Humane Society with the breaking ground of our Veterinary Lifesaving Center in 2022, which will include the development of a community clinic and ensure KHS is able to provide a full spectrum of innovative animal welfare programs and facilities.

 Listings /  North America

It was the spring of 1997. Kitten Rescue founder, Sue Romaine, was leaving her volunteer shift at the West Valley Animal Shelter. She happened to cross paths with a gentleman carrying a brown paper bag. The bag contained a tiny four-week-old kitten that the man had found in his yard. He was headed into the shelter to turn it in. The man told Sue that he had brought the siblings in the day before, but this one had been hard to catch. Sue’s heart sank, as she knew that the siblings had been euthanized immediately by shelter staff due to their young age. This kitten would surely face the same fate if she did not intervene. Without hesitation, Sue said, “I will take it.” She named the kitten Jackpot, and he became Kitten Rescue’s first foster kitten. Twenty years and over 17,000 cats later, here we are! Kitten Rescue is a non-profit, volunteer-run organization devoted to finding loving homes for unwanted, homeless cats and kittens. We rescue cats and kittens from the streets of Los Angeles and from City Shelter euthanasia. Since our start in 1997, we have grown into one of the largest, most well-respected animal welfare groups in LA. Kitten Rescue volunteers adopt out over 1,000 cats and kittens into homes every year. Since we began, we have rescued and placed over 21,000 cats into loving homes. Thousands more have been helped through our volunteer-fueled education and outreach programs. We educate the public about responsible pet guardianship, how to care for kittens and cats, and the importance of spaying and neutering. Kitten Rescue makes educational material available via events, print, school presentations and here on our website. We also provide Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) assistance for communities in and around Los Angeles, and teach people how to manage and care for feral cat colonies.

 Listings /  North America

The Kentucky Humane Society (KHS), located in Louisville, KY, is a private, nonprofit organization that is Kentucky’s largest pet adoption agency. KHS is also the state’s oldest animal welfare organization, founded in 1884. The Kentucky Humane Society is a champion for companion animals. Through leadership, education and proactive solutions, we are creating more compassionate communities. KHS envisions a day when every companion animal is given the care, resources and lifelong home they deserve. Our success is measured in the number of dogs, cats and horses we save – through adoption or placement in another rescue, or those who are returned to their owners. In 2020, 5,508 dogs, cats and horses ultimately were adopted. Thanks to our amazing supporters, 3,286 cats, 2,150 dogs and 72 horses found new homes. This includes 90 animals who were transferred out to other rescues. While KHS is most known for adoptions, we have many programs—all designed to strengthen the bond between people and pets, and ultimately end pet overpopulation and homelessness. In a typical year, the KHS S.N.I.P. Clinic (Spay/Neuter Incentive Program) spays or neuters more than 12,000 dogs and cats each year – helping reduce pet overpopulation and eliminate future animal suffering. KHS offers a variety of training opportunities designed to keep pets in their original homes and out of shelters. KHS’s behavior trainers are professionally trained and certified. We offer a wide-range of classes from puppy and basic manners, to classes for dog-reactive dogs and shy dogs, canine sports classes such as agility, and even group therapy sessions for special issues. KHS instructors use only positive reinforcement techniques, and classes are taught at locations throughout Louisville. Our Equine C.A.R.E. (connect, assist, rescue & educate) program focuses on helping Kentucky’s at-risk horses.

 Listings /  North America

The City of Los Angeles Animal Services Department (LAAS) was established 153 years ago. LAAS’s major areas of responsibility are saving the lives of animals that end up at one of our six City shelters, Public Safety and Enforcement of Municipal Code (Article 3:53.00). LA Animal Services operates six animal shelters and has field staff serving the community. The shelters are award-winning facilities that have been built within the past 10-15 years. LAAS is one of the largest municipal shelter systems in the U.S., serving approximately 60,000 animals annually and responding to 20,000 emergency calls each year involving animals or people in danger. Each shelter has at least one veterinarian as well as Registered Vet Techs to assist. Our veterinary team has training and experience in orthopedic surgery, wildlife, high volume spay/neuter and more. Our field staff includes a world-class Specialized Mobile Animal Rescue Team (SMART)– one of only two in the country, our Animal Control Officers are recognized experts in handling animal cruelty cases, they handle permits and all code enforcement including licensing, spay/neuter, leash laws and more whether they are helping dogs, cats, hawks, alligators, horses, turtles, etc. or the people who love them or fear them. LAAS is often the leader on progressive animal issues. Los Angeles was the first major city to pass the ban of the use of the elephant bull hook inspiring other cities fall into step, Ringling Brothers began making plans to retire the elephants from circus acts. The earliest declawing legislation began here and is now being considered by New York and beyond. The anti-puppy mill ordinance to prevent the importation of mill bred puppies and kittens began in Los Angeles, and cities across the United States are starting to join that movement.

 Listings /  North America

Last Chance Animal Rescue operates in Washington D.C., Maryland and Virginia. We take in cats and dogs from more than 50 high-kill shelters in 12 states and provide disaster-relief services for pets. We partner with more than 30 PetSmart and Petco stores in the region and provide full service in-store cat adoptions. Last Chance annually rescues and rehomes some 10,000 pets and since 1999, we’ve provided loving homes for more than 100,000 cats and dogs. We rescue animals from high-kill shelters to help them find permanent homes... We are part of the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC)! CFC#69822. We are one of the largest no-kill animal rescue organizations in the United States. Partnering with PetSmart Charities and PETCO, Last Chance rescues and rehomes approximately 10,000 animals a year.

 Listings /  North America

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